South Carolinian Teachers Don’t Get Paid Peanuts

Teachers outside of colleges, universities, and other institutions of higher education throughout the United States typically bring home low salaries. Even though public education is unarguably vital to the virality, success, and sustenance of future generations all around the world, it seems as if administrators in education and politicians simply don’t value the roles of teachers as much as society feels they should.

Despite the average teacher’s salary being generally laughably low when considering how much work they pour into their professions and the average pay of people who work similarly hard and attend college for up to seven years, South Carolina offered the 47th-highest salary to beginning teachers in its public schools during the 2016-2017 school year.

South Carolina ranked in at just $33,057 in the most recent school year statistics are available for. Statistics for the most recent academic year, that of 2017-2018, should be available in the next calendar year, around one year from the time of this piece’s publication.

Although “money isn’t always everything,” according to Dr. George Metz, School of Education Dean of South Carolina’s own Charleston Southern University, “it’s nice not to go paycheck to paycheck or have two jobs.”

“Surely,” some readers might be thinking, “the average salary of a teacher in South Carolina upon hiring must be disproportionally weighted down by particularly low-income hires.” However, this reasoning couldn’t be more false.

The median starting salary of teachers across the United States, per the National Education Association, is roughly $38,617. Although some individuals were paid this much in their first years of teaching in the state of South Carolina in 2017, no county across the state paid more than the national average, even those with the highest budgets to work with or located in high-income areas.

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